Blog: 6 points of interest for better biosecurity

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Hygiene specialist Nick Paridaans writes a monthly blog about HyCare in broiler farming. In his first blog Paridaans gives tips for better Biosecurity.

In order to keep your business running and prevent company blindness, it is important that regular guidance is provided by third parties. Think of (feed) advisors and veterinarians. They are welcome on the farm, but may also bring threats such as viruses, (myco)bacteria and parasites that are a threat to your poultry. Of course you want to prevent that. On many farms measures are already being taken, but to be really sure it is good to think about further tightening up these measures. Based on these six points of attention and tips, you can take biosecurity on your farm to a higher level.

External biosecurity - inheritors

  • Good yard fences and gates ensures that the yard and stables can be closed and uninvited guests are excluded. For example, work with 'Forbidden Access' and 'First Report' signs. 
  • Physical protocols ensure that it is clear to every visitor what is expected of him/her. Where should the car be parked? How should the visitor report? What are the walking routes? What is the clean and what is the dirty part?
  • Employees with "hobby poultry" are a risk, be extra careful with them. 
  • Make sure you have a good walk-through shower and sufficient work clothing. This will make the use of the hygiene lock more attractive and employees/visitors can start working in a pleasant way.  
  • The decontamination of all materials/instruments (vehicles and instruments) before entering the company buildings reduces the risk of disease introduction. 
  • Provide visible hand and shoe disinfection when entering company buildings from the outside.

Transport

  • In addition to wheel arch disinfection, the total disinfection of trucks by using a disinfection gate is a good way to prevent infiltration.
  • Use products that are non-aggressive on paint and metals and that are effective for disinfection of transportation equipment.
  • Provide a proprietary feed hose and store it, for example, in a closable tube on the wall.
  • Do not allow drivers to enter the stables and always let them wear disposable clothes and shoes.

Entering the stables

  • Work with visual barriers so that it is visible where clothing and footwear changes take place.
  • Place a disinfection container directly at the entrance with a fast-acting agent and color indicator and refresh it if there is no more colorant in it.
  • Regularly clean and disinfect the premises to avoid dragging unnecessary dirt into the buildings.
  • Clean and disinfect the hands before and after visiting the stable or use disposable gloves per barn. 
  • Work with clear color zones in the stables and areas and change clothes / footwear per stable or area to create visual barriers and avoid the risk of errors.

Carcass removal

  • Carcasses are not transported via the anterooms, but for example via a drainage pipe in the stable wall.
  • Always use disposable gloves
  • Leave carcass buckets hanging in the stable
  • Use a wheelbarrow with an external seal and clean/disinfect each time after use.
  • Make sure the carcass is cooled properly. Place it sufficiently away from the stable, preferably at the roadside, look for shady spots and avoid a dusty surrounding. 

Pests

  • Make sure that all holes and cracks in the stables are closed.
  • A well-kept company site limits the number of hiding places for pests such as rats and mice. Make sure the grass is mowed, leaves are not left lying around, and create a gravel / broken shell path around the stables.
  • No (construction) materials, tools, trees / shrubs directly along the barn. These are ideal hiding places.
  • Work with a clear control plan and consistent monitoring. This applies to rats/mice, flies, blood lice as well as (tempex)beetles.

Supply / storage

  • Treat your wheat, lucerne, etc. to prevent yeasts/fungus and bacteria.
  • It is a good idea to close the storage areas completely because of birds and vermin.
  • At laying hen farms we often see that manure is stored. It is important to treat them against maggots and flies as these are perfect places to multiply. 

 

Hygiene specialist

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